Category Archives: things i read this week

Things I read recently that I found interesting

It’s that occasional round-up again!

Same as it ever was, only much worse (Dykes To Watch Out For)- In our hour of need, DTWOF returned after eight years hiatus!

Oral History: In 1985 Mr. Snuffleupagus Shocked ‘Sesame Street’ (various)- A really sweet oral history of how the decision was made to reveal Mr Snuffleupagus as real, and how it tied in to teaching children being abused that they would be believed.

Juridified Dispossession: Brexit, Migrant Workers and the Law (Gracie May Bradley)- What will Brexit mean for workers’ rights? Bad things, very very bad things.

Prejudice, “Political Correctness,” and the Normalization of Donald Trump (Julia Serano)- Theorising about the rejection of “identity politics” and what we can do next.

Political correctness: how the right invented a phantom enemy (Moira Weigel)- A history of the myth of “political correctness” and fighting this imaginary enemy led to Trump’s election.

The eroticization of abusers: from jizz in the face feminism to dapper white supremacists (Flavia Dzodan)- Examining and unpicking a particular strand of fuckery within white feminism.

From inside Colnbrook: my drawing is my feeling (Jay)- A young man in detention talks about the impact of detention and shares art he has produced.

Five Tropes Fanfic Readers Love (And One They Hate) (Flourish Klink)- Analysing preferences of fanfic readers and presenting massive survey results.

‘I knew I was home’: a trans woman’s journey through porn (Nadika Nadja)- A side of porn we rarely talk about.

It’s Time To Retire the “No Blacks, No Asians” Topic (Angry Black Hoemo)- Why discussions of racism in the gay community are limited in scope and unlikely to bring about much change.

No One Makes It Out Alive (Casey Plett and Morgan M Page)- Developing a trans reading of Little Shop of Horrors.

And finally, ever wanted to see a capybara farting in the bath to the chagrin of some ducks? Of course you do.

 


Things I read recently that I found interesting

Welcome to the semi-regular link round-up. It’s been a while since I’ve put one of these up, on account of the apocalypse having come (and also, I went on holiday).

Memorialising 2016: Transgender Day of Remembrance– Today is TDoR, and this year 271 murders of trans people have been recorded. The vast majority of them are trans women of colour. Read the list of their names, and remember their brutal killings.

Free e-books for the struggle ahead (AK Press)- Three books about resisting fascism are now available for free from AK Press. It’s vital that we are ready, and we know the history and tactics available to us. Also, free books, everyone!

Introducing Post Trump Europe (Flavia Dzodan)- This rise of fascism is not just limited to the USA. Flavia provides a brief, intelligent overview.

Preparing Your Children For The Apocalypse (Jendella Benson)- Reflections as a parent on the terrifying turn of world events.

Fuck Trump, But Fuck You Too: No Unity With Liberals (Bobby London)- Liberals are holding back any effective resistance, and maintaining the hierarchy of violence.

They interned my family. Don’t let them do it to Muslims. (George Takei)- George Takei–yes, that George Takei–has a warning from recent history.

Not guilty does not mean innocent (Rashida Islam)- A reminder, for those who have some weird vested interest in defending rapists.

Stop Calling Human Trafficking “Modern Day Slavery” (Eminism)- Some points as to why this phrase is inaccurate and appropriative.

Unaccompanied minors (judeinlondon)- A twitter thread on the needs of refugee children and why white people reject them.

Obedience tests (pookleblinky)- A twitter thread on normalising fascism and how we must disrupt at every step.

And finally, meet the Horniman Walrus, London’s most terrifying taxidermy, and read this cute little interview. As a bonus, have some ugly medieval cats. Yes, two jolly links today, because everything is terrible.


Things I read recently that I found interesting

Welcome to the occasional link round-up. Here are some things I read recently that I found interesting.

Aberfan: The mistake that cost a village its children– On the anniversary of the tragedy, survivors, rescuers and families tell their stories.

“I’m not looking for a new England”: On the Limitations of Radical Nationalism (Kojo Koram)- How nationalism cannot be reclaimed, and a better model.

A post-Brexit spike in homophobic hate crime? It’s a part of ‘taking back control’ (James Butler)- The increased violence is a feature, not a bug.

Gender stereotypes have made us horrible at recognizing autism in women and girls (Matthew Rosza)- A useful introduction into gender and autism.

Porn Didn’t Ruin Your Sex Life. Sorry. (Kitty Stryker)- A porn performer explores what actually ruins sex lives (tl;dr it’s men).

Men’s Silent Consent Of Rape Culture (Shane Thomas)- I don’t usually recommend stuff about rape culture written by men. This is a very welcome exception.

Thirteen things I wish I’d learned before choosing non-monogamy (Lola Phoenix)- These points are all SO important, and currently poly/non mono people should read and take note, too.

And finally, it was Ursula Le Guin’s 87th birthday. Did you know that as well as being an awesome SFF writer, she loves cats, and writes blogs about her cat? And from her cat’s point of view? And there’s loads of pictures of her cat, too? Here’s Le Guin’s Annals of Pard.


Things I read recently that I found interesting

It’s link roundup time!

Bad science misled millions with chronic fatigue syndrome. Here’s how we fought back (Julie Rehmeyer)- If you have ME/CFS, you’ll know that exercise and therapy probably don’t help you. This is because the science was nonsense.

Why Neuroscientists Need to Study the Crow (Grigori Guitchounts)- Crows are excellent beasties, capable of complex cognition, but this shakes up everything we think we know about cognition, because they lack a neocortex.

Why we have to take white working class people’s fears seriously (Jacinta Nandi)- On the misconception of working class people coming from the media and political class.

The Luke Cage Syllabus: A Breakdown of All the Black Literature Featured in Netflix’s Luke Cage (Tara Betts)- Enjoyed the series? What do you mean you haven’t watched it yet, go and watch it right now, and come back in 13 hours to read all of these book recommendations.

Jess Phillips targeting marginalised women proves it’s her own career she puts first (Stephanie Farnsworth)- Why this brand of feminism needs to be taken with a pinch of salt.

Why I Find Safe Sex With Men Much More Difficult Than With Women (Andre Shakti)- I related to this too damn hard.

And finally, have a cuddle puddle of big cats.


Things I read recently that I found interesting

It’s link roundup time, once again!
‘We build a wall around our sanctuaries’: Queerness and Precarity– (Joni Pitt (Cohen) & Sophie Monk)- This article on queer lives under austerity is essential reading.

Occupy vs. Reclaim: what’s in a name? (Sisters Uncut)- Are these activists occupying or reclaiming spaces? They explain.

Looking at Paris Is Burning 25 years after its release (Shon Faye)- Examining the enormous cultural and personal impact of this documentary

On Outrage (Alison Phipps)- Reflecting on outrage and its function, and carceral solutions.

A relationship is not a skill (Lola Phoenix)- Dispelling the myth in poly/nonmonog communities that relationships are something you need to have your own skills to be “good at”.

The psychology behind the unfunny consequences of racist and sexist jokes (Thomas E. Ford)- A short introduction on what purpose such jokes serve.

Dear rapists, I don’t give a f*ck about your future (Chelsea Hensley)- V. V. cathartic

Are “faux-feminists” the new pick-up artists? (Roe McDermott)- Honestly, I related to this so much I wondered if Roe and I had dated the exact same awful men, until I remembered just how widespread their shit is.

POPsec Part 1: Security Lessons Learned from Harry Potter (Totally Not Malware)- A useful primer.

Caster Semenya won the gold medal in the 800m race. (Zoe Samudzi)- Examining the intersections of misogyny and racism and the nonsense of gender testing in sport.

I’m fat, and I have a restrictive eating disorder (Barbed Wire Wings)- A clear look at the experience and misconceptions faced.

The Internet Thinks I’m Still Pregnant (Amy Pittman)- The more absurd consequences of data sharing.

Worst of McMansions– This blog is fun, snarky, and tricks you into learning about architecture.

And finally, the story in this twitter thread is one of the cutest things I have ever read.

 

View story at Medium.com


Things I read

Welcome to the exceptionally-late round up. Here are some articles.

Black Lives Matter: Why we #Shutdown Heathrow Airport this morning (Wail Qasim)- A report on the action. Follow UK Black Lives Matter. Twitter FB Vital work.

My feminism will be capitalist, appropriative and bullshit merchandise (Flavia Dzodan)- Flavia coined a very popular feminist slogan, but it’s been appropriated and profited from.

10 things about BDSM and 10 things about better kinky sex (Queer Anarchism)- An exceptionally good short critique of the problems of BDSM, and a move towards solutions.

For Poly Folks Who Desperately Need Autonomy (brute reason)- This meditation on relationship needs, contrary to the title, is probably a must-read for everyone, not just poly people.

Outing gay men on Grindr isn’t journalism. It’s homophobic and dangerous (Huw Lemmey)- A resplendently furious, comprehensive and sadly necessary response.

Hollywood Has Ruined Method Acting (Angelica Jade Bastien)- How the Hollywood style of method acting is absolutely awful.

Why I now stand with Caster Semenya (Madeleine Pape)- An athlete explains how she came round to supporting one of the greatest runners in the world.

A Peek Inside Berlin’s Queer Club Scene Before Hitler Destroyed It (Clayton J. Whisnant)- A little bit of forgotten history.

The Spoon Theory Gave People the Wrong Idea About My Illness (Jennie Smales)- The spoon theory helps some people explain their disabilities, but abled people still get the wrong end of the stick.

Getting Rid Of Clothes I Hated Helped Me Love My Body (Arianna Rebolini)- I did this myself, and for me it worked a hell of a lot better than losing weight.

No Human is Illegal: Immigration raids that treat migrants as criminals are a disgrace (Maya Goodfellow)- Examining the wider context to Byron’s egregious behaviour–hope you’re still boycotting those rip-off burgers though!

Does Marge have friends? (Raphael Bob-Waksberg)- A short twitter poem that made me cry.

A Closed Loop: Sex Work, Violence and Criminalisation (Molly Smith)- Looking at community violence against sex workers, and how it interacts with criminalising the job.

Detransition, Desistance, and Disinformation: A Guide for Understanding Transgender Children Debates (Julia Serano)- An exceptionally handy guide to what’s really going on.

And finally, have an accidental broadcast of Aziz Ansari subtitles over a nature show, it made me cackle.


Things I read recently that I found interesting

Greetings and welcome to the link round-up, as the world burns. This is a bumper edition because a lot has happened recently.

Open Letter: The BBC must stop uncritical coverage of fascists (Media Diversified)- A call for responsible broadcasting.

Amid the bitter divisions we must unite against racist and fascist abuse (Chimene Suleyman)- Wise words which must be heeded.

Here’s How We Fight Racism Now That Brexit Has Won (Wail Qasim)- A necessary look forward.

Brexit has echoes of the breakup of Yugoslavia (Catherine Baker)- A terrifying look at parallels with the situation in the 90s.

Isolated Incidents (Nikesh Shukla)- The devastating impact of hate attacks, and how they accumulate.

Euthanasia as a Dutch neoliberal success story (Flazia Dzodan)- Examining how right-to-die works under neoliberalism, to frightening effect.

We have the wrong idea about males, females and sex (David Robson)- Looking at evidence which challenges traditional myths.

The Dangers Of Dating Faux-Feminist Men (Kate Sloan)- How men use feminist rhetoric to manipulate, abuse and coerce. Sadly, this resonated a lot with me.

Warning: Pokemon GO is a Death Sentence if you are a Black Man. (Omari Akil)- Why, due to white supremacy, this game isn’t for everyone.

Evidence (Sara Ahmed)- Critically examining what evidence means, to whom and how.

Black Lives Matter more than a police float (Nora Loreto)- Setting out some necessary priorities.

My Brother Died In Police Custody – Here’s What Black Lives Matter Means To Me (Marcia Rigg)- As Britain’s burgeoning BLM movement begins to gather momentum, the sister of a young man killed by police talks why it’s so important.

I Have My Anger Back (Jendella Benson)- A black woman writes to her son.

Westeros is Poorly Designed (Lyman Stone)- A gloriously nerdy look at the world from Game of Thrones and how it makes no goddamn sense on a population scale. You’ll learn lots about human geography and economics.

Employment Must Not Be the Aim of Mental Health Treatment (Dr Jay Watts)- Why were therapists protesting? Because they care about patients.

Abolish the Police. Instead, Let’s Have Full Social, Economic, and Political Equality. (Mychal Denzel Smith)- Envisioning a world without police and examining who the police protect.

On Coming Out and Existing; or, Resentments to the theme of Materiality (AB Silvera)- Thoughtful meditations, responding to an article on never coming out.

Why I’m Nonbinary But Don’t Use ‘They/Them’ (Ashleigh Shackelford)- A personal story of a black nonbinary person who also identifies with black womanhood.

The Best Time I Pretended I Hadn’t Heard of Slavoj Žižek (Rosa Lyster)- A fun new game for us all.

Blerd Girl Magic: The MD and Black Girl Nerds’ Founders Interview– Two incredible black women who formed media platforms explain their vital work.

What Can We Learn About Prime Minister Theresa May from Her Time as Home Secretary? (Wail Qasim)- A close examination of the new PM’s track record.

Blowing the Whistle on Oppressive Policing and Surveillance (NetPol)- Launching a whistleblowing service on police and state surveillance. This is very necessary work, follow it closely.

And finally, have a video of some otters playing the keyboard. You deserve it.